Divine Writings

Updated: Jan 28

Shortly after September 11, 2991, I stumbled onto looking at my old book about Nostradamus’ prophecies. Unlike all the times past (after some major world event had occurred), I found the quatrains (4-line poems) filled with a theme that fit: Islam versus Christianity.


Certainly, from being a ‘know nothing fan’ of Nostradamus to being an ‘expert’ unlike any other did not occur overnight. Over the past eighteen plus years, almost nineteen now, I have evolved greatly. The old book that I owned presented nothing about the letters Nostradamus wrote: the Preface (called a letter to his infant son Cesar) and the Epistle to King Henry II of France. Looking into what is written in those letters had a profound effect on my ‘learning curve.’


After ten years of close examination of the Old French texts and finding the proper tools for translations (not nearly as readily available as the Internet makes things now), I wrote the book The Systems of Nostradamus: Instructions for Making Sense of The Prophecies.

Published April 28, 2010

This book presents the syntax of Nostradamus in an entirely new perspective. The language used by Nostradamus was seen as French, but it made no sense. The words used were recognizable (most of them), but the way the words were put together seemed as though Nostradamus had suffered some head injury and wasn’t all there in the mind. The true is Nostradamus wrote what was told to him by God, using the same language (divine syntax) that is found in all prophecy.


It is from this level of understanding that I began to write about Holy Scripture in the same way that I had written about Nostradamus’ writings. The same “systems used by Nostradamus” are what one needs to use to read the Holy Bible. The same principles apply.

Simply because Nostradamus entitled his work “Les Propheties” (“The Prophecies“), the capitalization of “The” becomes a major statement about “This” that is written. The capitalization of “Prophecies” is a strong statement that the words contained within the book are “the divine utterances of God.” However, readers become accustomed to think nothing about God, so they think “The Prophecies of Nostradamus” are just some predictions made by a man.


It is important to show a desire to listen to what God said through His Prophets. Nostradamus was a Prophet of God. Therefore, “The Prophecies of Nostradamus” are no different than any other book of the Holy Bible. One could actually refer to it as The Book of Nostradamus, Prophet of God.


R. T. Tippett

#divinelanguage #Nostradamus #SystemsofNostradamus

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