Psalm 107:1-3, 23-32 - Riding out the storm of contradictions

Updated: May 25

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1 Give thanks to Yahweh, for he is good, *

and his mercy endures forever.

2 Let all those whom Yahweh has redeemed proclaim *

that he redeemed them from the hand of the foe.

3 He gathered them out of the lands; *

from the east and from the west,

from the north and from the south.

23 Some went down to the sea in ships *

and plied their trade in deep waters;

24 They beheld the works of Yahweh *

and his wonders in the deep.

25 Then he spoke, and a stormy wind arose, *

which tossed high the waves of the sea.

26 They mounted up to the heavens and fell back to the depths; *

their hearts melted because of their peril.

27 They reeled and staggered like drunkards *

and were at their wits' end.

28 Then they cried to Yahweh in their trouble, *

and he delivered them from their distress.

29 He stilled the storm to a whisper *

and quieted the waves of the sea.

30 Then were they glad because of the calm, *

and he brought them to the harbor they were bound for.

31 Let them give thanks to Yahweh for his mercy *

and the wonders he does for his children.

32 Let them exalt him in the congregation of the people *

and praise him in the council of the elders.


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This psalm of David is 43 verses long in total. Thirteen of them are recited on the fourth Sunday after Pentecost, as an accompaniment to the optional reading from Job, where Yahweh answered his pleas for explanation why he was suffering. In these thirteen verses, the same God of Job was the God of David. Both wrote the name Yahweh, as neither were so disconnected from hearing His voice that they deceitfully muttered a degenerate “Lord,” due to having no connection whatsoever to Yahweh. Both Job’s and David’s souls were married to Yahweh, thus they called out His name directly, having a most close relationship. No one at the NRSV headquarters, nor anywhere in the Episcopal Church [none at lease these dark days of religious heresy] can dare to say Yahweh, without falling dead from the fright of seeing their soul cast into the outer darkness where there will be a gnashing of teeth. Say “Hi” to Judas Iscariot and your "Lord” Satan, when you get there.


When verse one is shown as, “Give thanks to Yahweh, for he is good, and his mercy endures forever,” it is idiotic to say Yahweh is “good.” Since David was no idiot, he wrote, “kî- ṭō·wḇ” or “for good-pleasurable-agreeable.” The “thanks given” is “for” oneself [a self = a soul] has done the opposite of “bad-sorrowfulness-disagreeable.” This says “thanks” is “given” because without Yahweh’s presence [His Spirit in marriage] one would be a constant sinner and a reject from eternal salvation. Therefore, when one’s soul has received “goodness” through marriage, then the “mercy” that is forgiveness of past sins lasts “forever,” meaning one receives “mercy” through a Covenant that promises a soul will forever serve Yahweh as His wife.


Verse two then follows, saying “Let all those whom Yahweh has redeemed proclaim that he redeemed them from the hand of the foe.” This then speaks of “letting” those who have married Yahweh and thereby been “redeemed” “speak” of salvation. The “hand of the foe” must be seen as the soul-body having previously been possessed by Satan, the “enemy” of Yahweh and single [unwed] souls. This mean “let speak the redeemed” as Yahweh incarnated on earth, which comes as one of the “elohim,” as a Christ – Sacredly Anointed.


Verse three then sings, “He gathered them out of the lands; from the east and from the west, from the north and from the south.” From David’s perspective, the four points of direction refer to all corners of Israel, which pointed to the “lands” of the Twelve Tribes of Israel. Under David, his having been Anointed by Yahweh through Samuels’ pouring of oil, meant his leadership led other Israelites to likewise be married to Yahweh, bringing about a time when that nation of peoples was indeed Holy. In modern times, the worldly spread of Christianity has meant Saints have been raised from the four corners of the globe. It does not matter where a soul comes from, as long as it is married to Yahweh.


At this point, the selected verses to be sung aloud or read in unison leaps forward to verse twenty-three. There David sang, “Some went down to the sea in ships and plied their trade in deep waters.” Here, the reason for the leap is to draw in sailing metaphor that matches the Gospel reading from Mark, where Jesus calmed the wind and made the sea peaceful. The metaphor being stated by David in this verse says the “sea” is reference to the collection of souls married to Yahweh. The aspect of “trade” or “business” must be realized as the “acts” of apostles in ministry, but also the "business" of religion. Therefore, the “deep waters” refer to the hidden meaning of Scripture, which releases a flood of emotional waters that send other souls seeking marriage to Yahweh.


Verse twenty-four then adds, “They beheld the works of Yahweh and his wonders in the deep.” This is a wife of Yahweh being enabled to find the deeper truth that comes forth, which other Israelites fail to see.


Verse twenty-five then sings, “Then he spoke, and a stormy wind arose, which tossed high the waves of the sea.” This “stormy wind” comes from “rū·aḥ sə·‘ā·rāh” or “ruach ca'ar,” which matches the “whirlwind” from which Yahweh spoke to Job [the pairing for this psalm] and the “storm” with “winds” in the Mark story of Jesus on the sea. The Hebrew means Yahweh spoke in a soul [“ruach”] and the soul was moved to become a “tempest.” This makes the “waves” that are “raised” in understanding as the tumult that comes from seeing the truth be exposed that no leader has ever explained before. To find Scripture after Scripture having deeper meaning, a Saint is in a “ship” of religion that is being rocked by the truth being exposed.


Verse twenty-six then says, “They mounted up to the heavens and fell back to the depths; their hearts melted because of their peril.” The Hebrew word translated as “they mounted up” more aptly means “they ascended.” This says their souls were elevated to a divine state of being, after marrying Yahweh and becoming one with His Spirit. From that height of being Spiritually raised, they could then descend into the depth of Scriptural meaning, like never capable of before. The word translated as “heart” [“nephesh”] actually means “souls,” such that all the troubles or “perils" felt by their souls prior “melted” away, when the truth was read.


Verse twenty-seven then sings, “They reeled and staggered like drunkards and were at their wits' end.” This imagery gives the impression of sailors being tossed about on a boat on a stormy sea. While that is a valid image in a dream or vision, the metaphor says the “ship” that is the religion that sailed upon [either Judaism or Christianity], those onboard were “reeling to and fro.” This reflects how the verses of Scripture have been made to say so many things, when deeply inspected they appear contradictory. Thus, when asked to explain some of those contradiction, they stagger around like drunken sailors, unable to give a clear answer, without slurring their words. They had been put at their wits’ end by trying to stretch the fibers of their brain matter to see what was impossible to be seen, without divine guidance.


Verse twenty-eight then sings, “Then they cried to Yahweh in their trouble, and he delivered them from their distress.” Here is the truth of souls married to Yahweh, as whenever a wife is in need of explaining the truth to someone, when the rockiness of contradiction seems to be about to make a soul ‘jump ship,’ that close relationship receives the answer needed. By asking one’s Holy Husband to bring the calm needed to see the light, a wife will be comforted.


Verse twenty-nine then sings, “He stilled the storm to a whisper and quieted the waves of the sea.” This states that one’s prayers will be answered, if one calls out to Yahweh. Calling out “Lord” might bring some huge satanic bird from the sky to come flying down, making things worse. This is what Jesus did, when his apostles cried out “Master” when they thought all was lost. They did not call him by name because they had no faith. No faith says one keeps a soul free and single, able to do whatever oneself wishes. That works best when not in troubling times.


Verse thirty then sings, “Then were they glad because of the calm, and he brought them to the harbor they were bound for.” This speaks of the desire to not be faced with tumult and grief. The “safe harbor” or “haven” is where one is no longer in a quest to make one’s religion a “business” or “trade.” The safety comes from being surrounded with souls who love to be of same mind. This can be seen in the Epistle reading from Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, as Corinth was such a “haven” for souls seeking to marry Yahweh.


Verse thirty-one then sings, “Let them give thanks to Yahweh for his mercy and the wonders he does for his children.” Here, again, the reader is returned to the proposal “to give thanks to Yahweh,” as was seen in verse one. Again the thanks is given for “his goodness” [not “mercy”], which is not an assessment of God’s being “good,” but His wives, through marriage to Him. When the translation says, “the wonders he does for his children,” the Hebrew more aptly says, “for the wonderful works of his sons of men.” While all human beings become wives in marriage to Yahweh, their souls when merged with His Spirit become His “elohim,” which takes on a masculine essence, such that even the souls of boys and girls and circus freaks that marry Yahweh becomes “sons of mankind,” as all “elohim” in human flesh are His “sons.”


Verse thirty-two then sings, “Let them exalt him in the congregation of the people and praise him in the council of the elders.” This then becomes a reflection of the same message told in verse two, where the meaning is the wives of Yahweh go into ministry for Him, singing praises about being so divinely in union, so all who express belief in Yahweh [the “congregation” or “assembly of people”] can likewise be married in Spirit and become true “elders” who teach “praises” of truth to all they lead.


As a Psalm accompanying a reading from Job, where Yahweh speaks from a whirlwind, as well as before the Gospel reading from Mark, when Jesus calms the storm at sea, they all speak of becoming married souls to God and becoming His priests in ministry. This makes this a good choice for the fourth Sunday after Pentecost, when those who have true faith have been sent out into the world as Yahweh’s servants. It is important to see how this ministry is not to be a profession. The payment for service rendered is salvation. As salvation comes from the sacrifice of self-ego, so one dies symbolically, just like Jesus died, the soul must relinquish all material desires. Ministry is not about a meager salary, with great benefits and a retirement package. If it were, death would mean one’s soul had already received payment in full. Therefore, true ordination as a priest of Yahweh comes without a job title and without a uniform.